On “Fundamentals of Software Architecture”

In all honesty, I’m somewhere near my 30s now and besides knowing to program in pretty much any language (or to that end, able to learn one in a few hours) I have to admit I have lost the passion towards high-frequency coding, in the sense of LOCs (lines of code) per hour, but I’m more and more attracted to the art of building software and systems architectures, with the least amount of glue code possible.

I believe that for the past years I’ve used and abused former Safari Books Online (now O’Reilly learning) plowing through every imaginable book on architecture, starting with the great reference book “Software Architecture In Practice, 3rd edition” by Len Bass, Paul Clements and Rick Kazman. Most of these authors and the authors that have dedicated a part of their time to book-writing have been members of the SEI (Software Engineering Institute).

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The software industry needs to learn to go slow in order to move fast

When I was young and deciding what career path would I take and when our teachers would ask what do we want to pursue, I’d always answer something along the lines of: “software engineer”. Twenty or so years ago I had much esteem for the trade. The principles of automating repetitive tasks, freeing someone from the day to day burden of repetitive chores and of course, of their salary, leaving them naked in the street, unable to feed their family, hunting for mice to survive seemed such a good investment of my time and skills.

Of course, I’m joking! Jesus! But the software industry is not and the reason that is happening is because pretty much any other industry, be it automotive, manufacturing, even sending satellites to space (and trust me, I know) is full of repetitive tasks that can be easily coded to perfection.

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